Publications

Abstract: This paper explores the state of urban science education as it relates to achievement and engagement of urban youth in science and provides insight on improving the experiences of urban youth in the science classroom through the lens of an urban science educator. It provides a framework for Hip-Hop Pedagogy as an innovative approach to teaching and learning, which anchors the culture, realities and lived experiences of urban youth in pedagogy. Finally, this paper provides educators with practical tools and approaches, which were formed from theory and research that transcend the traditional monolithic approach to teaching science and allows educators to learn and incorporate the culture of urban youth within their pedagogy.

Abstract: This dissertation explores the context of urban science education as it relates to the achievement and engagement of urban youth. This study provides a framework for Hip-Hop Pedagogy, an approach to teaching and learning anchored in the creative elements of Hip-Hop culture, in STEM as an innovative approach to teaching and learning demonstrates the effect that Hip-Hop Pedagogy, as a culturally relevant approach to teaching has on teaching and learning in an urban science classroom. This study establishes practical tools and approaches, which were formed from by theory and research that transcend the traditional monolithic approaches to teaching science. Participants in this study are middle school students who attend an urban school in one of the largest school systems in the country. This research showed that as result of utilizing Hip-Hop pedagogical practices, students reported that they developed a deeper understanding of science content, students were more likely to identify as scientists, and students were provided a space and opportunities to deconstruct traditional classroom spaces and structures.

Abstract: The underrepresentation of girls and students of color in STEM fields, particularly in science, is an ongoing issue that is very well documented. There is a limited amount of research that provides insight on experiences of girls, especially girls of color, who have been exposed to authentic science experiences. This article interrogates the effects of experiential learning on students’ science identity and interest in pursuing a career in STEM, specifically for girls of color. This study provides insight into girls of color experience of authentic science internships where they followed a traditional working scientist schedule, the use of, or referencing of specific science knowledge, and use of traditional science lab equipment. Through this study, researchers found that after participating in the authentic science internship, students became more confident to pursue careers in STEM-related fields and envisioned the field of science and STEM-related fields as approachable and accessible.

Purpose – This paper aims to argue that providing youth of color with opportunities to explore content while re ecting on and sharing mental health concerns is an under-focused dimension of teaching and learning that has the potential to positively impact these students’ academic achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines
Design/methodology/approach – This paper used a qualitative study to interrogate a teaching/ learning model through a hip-hop-based science program.
Findings – Because urban youth of color are traditionally most disengaged in STEM and also the ones who are the least likely to seek or be provided with mental health tools/services, it is suggested that there is a connection between their low academic achievement and the absence of opportunities for them to address emotions that impact their academic success. Furthermore, if these youths come from communities where mental health stressors are highly prevalent, and teaching is most restrictive, a model for teaching that considers practices that address both their academic and mental health needs becomes necessary.

Abstract: The underrepresentation of girls and students of color in STEM fields, particularly in science, is an ongoing issue that is very well documented. There is a limited amount of research that provides insight on experiences of girls, especially girls of color, who have been exposed to authentic science experiences. This article interrogates the effects of experiential learning on students’ science identity and interest in pursuing a career in STEM, specifically for girls of color. This study provides insight into girls of color experience of authentic science internships where they followed a traditional working scientist schedule, the use of, or referencing of specific science knowledge, and use of traditional science lab equipment. Through this study, researchers found that after participating in the authentic science internship, students became more confident to pursue careers in STEM-related fields and envisioned the field of science and STEM-related fields as approachable and accessible.

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©2018 Dr. Edmund S. Adjapong

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